Bioethanol Production with Cellulase Enzyme from Bacillus cereus Isolated from Sesame Seed Residue from the Jazan Region

Emad A. Abada, Yahya S. Masrahi, Mohamed Al-Abboud, Hassien M. Alnashiri, Khaled E. El-Gayar

Abstract


Bio-ethanol is considered as an important renewable fuel to partly replace fossil-derived fuels. In this study, bioethanol production, which includes cellulase production, saccharification of the cellulose content of sesame seed residue, and ethanol production, was investigated. Out of the hundreds of cellulase-producing bacterial strains isolated from sesame seed residue during this study, the B isolate was found to have the highest cellulase enzyme production. This isolate was identified as Bacillus cereus by 16S rRNA sequencing. The effects of different growth parameters, including inoculum concentration, incubation time, temperature, pH, and carbon and nitrogen sources, were investigated to optimize the growth conditions of the bacterium. The maximum cellulase activity was achieved with an inoculum concentration of 3% after 48 h in a basal medium at a pH of 7 and an incubation temperature of 35 °C. The best nitrogen and carbon sources were yeast extract and sesame seed residue, respectively. The results showed the liberation of 2.3 g/L of reducing sugar by the dinitrosalicylic acid method. This total reducing sugar produced 15 g/L of ethanol after 48 h when Saccharomyces cerevisiae was used as a fermentation agent. Hence, bioethanol was successfully produced from the cellulose of sesame seed residue using the cellulase enzyme from B. cereus.

Keywords


Sesame cake; Cellulase; Biofuel; Bacillus cereus

Full Text: PDF

Welcome to BioResources! This online, peer-reviewed journal is devoted to the science and engineering of biomaterials and chemicals from lignocellulosic sources for new end uses and new capabilities. The editors of BioResources would be very happy to assist you during the process of submitting or reviewing articles. Please note that logging in is required in order to submit or review articles. Martin A. Hubbe, (919) 513-3022, hubbe@ncsu.edu; Lucian A. Lucia, (919) 515-7707, lucian.lucia@gmail.com URLs: bioresourcesjournal.com; http://ncsu.edu/bioresources ISSN: 1930-2126