Resistance of Eucalyptus and Corymbia Treated Woods against Three Fungal Species

Dercilio Junior Verly Lopes, Juarez Benigno Paes, Gabrielly dos Santos Bobadilha

Abstract


The genera Eucalyptus and Corymbia are widely used in Brazil. Although they present remarkable applicability, they manifest substantial end-splitting and surface checks, which allows wood decay organisms to penetrate the wood. Thereby, the resistance of Eucalyptus grandis x Eucalyptus urophylla (EU) and Corymbia citriodora (CT) treated with chromated copper arsenate type-C (CCA-C) against fungi decay was evaluated. Seventy-two fence posts were assessed; for each species, there were 18 posts treated with CCA-C and 18 non-treated posts. The posts were 2.20 m long and classified into three classes of diameter. The 2% active ingredient was used with a vacuum-pressure cycle. On each fence, disks measuring 2.0 cm thick were cut at the outcrop zone. Two sets of depths were analyzed: the edge at 0 cm to 1.5 cm as well as the inner part at 1.5 cm to 3.0 cm. The samples were subjected to Postia placenta, Gloeophyllum trabeum, and Trametes versicolor attack. The treatment was effective against all fungi, but for CT, the diameter range of 8 cm to 12 cm was optimal. The treated wood from EU samples reached the lowest weight loss for all fungi. Heartwood-sapwood ratio played a major role. By comparing the non-treated woods, EU yielded the highest mass loss.

Keywords


Treated wood; Chromated copper arsenate tolerant fungi; Biological assay; Radial protection

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