The Use of Chemical and Biological Agents in the Recovery of Heavy Metals from Treated Woods – A Brief Review

Dercilio Junior Verly Lopes, Elizabeth C. Stokes, Gabrielly dos Santos Bobadilha

Abstract


This manuscript provides a brief review about chemical and biological agents used to bioremediate treated wood waste. Wood preservatives have been used to increase wood’s useful life, because any species is subject to decay. Studies indicate that the disposal of treated wood after its service has drawn concern and scrutiny. Practices have included disposal in landfills or construction sites as well as destruction by burning, so it is apparent that more environmentally friendly options are needed. To mitigate these problems, acidic agents, fungi, and bacteria can be used as alternatives to remove heavy metals. At optimum temperature and concentration, acids play a major role in the removal process. The process is enhanced when a bioremediation technique is used after chemical extraction. In fact, bioremediation has been shown to be a remarkable technique for recovering copper, arsenic, creosote, and other compounds. The major drawback is the extensive duration of fungal activity for release of heavy metals.

Keywords


Treated wood; Chromated copper arsenate; Bioremediation; Waste management

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Welcome to BioResources! This online, peer-reviewed journal is devoted to the science and engineering of biomaterials and chemicals from lignocellulosic sources for new end uses and new capabilities. The editors of BioResources would be very happy to assist you during the process of submitting or reviewing articles. Please note that logging in is required in order to submit or review articles. Martin A. Hubbe, (919) 513-3022, hubbe@ncsu.edu; Lucian A. Lucia, (919) 515-7707, lucian.lucia@gmail.com URLs: bioresourcesjournal.com; http://ncsu.edu/bioresources ISSN: 1930-2126