Gauging Concerns with Fit and Size of Garments among Young Consumers in Online Shopping

Hyejeong Kim, Mary Lynn Damhorst

Abstract


The purpose of this study was to develop scales to quantitatively measure the domain of concerns with fit and size of garments among young consumers (college students) in online shopping. Using an initial pool of items created through focus group interviews, a series of exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were performed to finalize the pool of items and to establish the construct, discriminant, and criterion validity of the finalized measures and reliability of the dimensions. Consumers’ concerns with fit and size of garments included multiple interrelated dimensions; five factors with 21 items were identified as the final sets of the scale. The dimensions include concerns with overall appearance, concerns with unavailability of size, concerns with projecting a correct impression, concerns with the inability to try on in online shopping, and concerns with imagining fit/size in online shopping. The scale developed in this study covers concerns with fit and size of garments among young female consumers. Therefore, the findings of this study may not be generalizable to other consumer groups. Fit and size of garments is one of the main issues in apparel purchase decisions and the most important concern in online apparel shopping. Therefore, the findings of this study provide online apparel retailers with valuable insights into consumers’ concerns with fit and size of garments, which will lead retailers to better merchandising and marketing strategies and allow them to influence consumers’ perceptions and behaviors in online shopping environments.

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