Obtaining Plasticized Starch and Microfibrillated Cellulose from Oil Palm Empty Fruit Bunches: Preparation and Properties of the Pure Materials and Their Composites

Valérya Carneiro Teles, Mariana Roldi, Sandra Maria Luz, Wellington Rangel dos Santos, Larissa Andreani, Leonardo Fonseca Valadares

Abstract


Starch and celluloses are biodegradable resources of great importance in terms of marketing. These biopolymers can be used to generate films with interesting mechanical, optical, and thermal properties, which can substitute for plastic films in certain applications, e.g., packaging materials. This study describes the preparation of pure plasticized starch films, prepared from soluble starch and glycerol, and the preparation of microfibrillated cellulose films from oil palm empty fruit bunches fabricated via casting. Composites made of plasticized starch were also prepared with microfibrillated cellulose added in 10% increments. The density, color difference, opacity, morphology, water activity, water affinity, and thermal and mechanical characteristics of the films were investigated. Plasticized starch is a translucent material with contact transparency; it is fragile and has relatively high water and glycerol contents. The thermogravimetric analysis of materials displayed up to four stages of weight loss related to water evaporation, glycerol, starch, and cellulose thermal degradation. As a consequence, the materials with higher cellulose content exhibited better thermal resistance. The composites with 90% of microfibrillated cellulose resulted in increased tensile strength when compared to the pure materials. The pure microfibrillated cellulose presented the highest values of Young modulus. The addition of plasticized starch to microfibrillated cellulose improved the maximum strain of the composites.

Keywords


Plasticized starch films; Microfibrillated cellulose; Oil palm empty fruit bunches; Mechanical and thermal properties

Full Text:

PDF


Welcome to BioResources! This online, peer-reviewed journal is devoted to the science and engineering of biomaterials and chemicals from lignocellulosic sources for new end uses and new capabilities. The editors of BioResources would be very happy to assist you during the process of submitting or reviewing articles. Please note that logging in is required in order to submit or review articles. Martin A. Hubbe, (919) 513-3022, hubbe@ncsu.edu; Lucian A. Lucia, (919) 515-7707, lucia-bioresources@ncsu.edu URLs: bioresourcesjournal.com; http://ncsu.edu/bioresources ISSN: 1930-2126